Back to Roots-  Building this aircraft under FAR Part 103.

The EMG-5 was designed to meet both the spirit and the letter of FAR Part 103 for true ultralights
The EMG-5 comes in under the strict 254 pound weight limit.

The appeal of Part 103 operations is that no registration is required for the aircraft and neither license nor medical is required for the pilot.

Referred to the following sections on this page:
The regulations, Part 103 (the regulation that governs the operation of ultralight aircraft.)
The preamble to the regulation
The FAA advisory circular (which spells out the particulars in implementing and policing ultralight aircraft.)

The Federal Aviation Regulation that regulates ultralight flying is called Part 103. These are the legal rules we fly by.
Part 103 defines an ultralight as:

In the past years have ultralight aircraft accounted for a significant percentage of the civilian-owned aircraft in the US. In fact, it was out of the ultralight industry that the light sport industry was actually born. However with the advent of light sport aircraft industry, we have seen a significant impediment to affordable flight. The costs associated with building new aircraft, registering, maintaining, and obtaining a pilot certificate are still substantial enough that in today's economy limiting the opportunity to take advantage of the wonders of flight simply.
We believe that ultralight aircraft can be built, maintained, and flown in the same professional manner that other aircraft are. However cost remains an ever present impediment for most people. As technology changes, new opportunities are making it possible for an even greater number of individuals to enjoy and share the pleasures of aviation; not only building their own aircraft, but flying it as well.

Among all of the segments in aviation today, none is easier to get into, cheaper to start, and offers more potential for reward than ultralights. It is, in our opinion, as good as it gets. Ultralight flying is an experience like no other. Whether they fly out of their local airport or their own backyard, ultralight pilots today enjoy the most exhilarating of flight experiences, with, possibly, more benefits than any other segment of aviation.

Take a look at these advantages:

• You are not required to have a pilot’s license or a medical

• The aircraft doesn’t even have to be registered

• No required written or oral exams

• The cost to build is relatively low

• Low operating costs

• Simplicity of operation

• Short take off and landing distances

• Soft field capabilities

• Easy to transport

• Easy to store

• The ability to operate out of a short private runway

Flying in a Part 103 environment meets the needs for the vast majority of pilots. Whether this be hopping around the patch doing touch and goes, sightseeing, or just out seeking the challenges of flying a glider, just the sheer pleasure of being in the air .
Let's talk about some of the positive attributes of flying a part 103 aircraft and some of the challenges.
While flight training is required to hold a pilot certificate is not required to fly a part 103 aircraft.
There are no requirements mandated by the FAA for inspections or maintenance.
Part 103 aircraft are typically short field takeoff and landing aircraft. And are often flown out of one's own property or even stored in one's own garage.
There are no restrictions regarding construction. No requirements for you to build 51% of your own aircraft.
No registration requirements by the FAA.
There are restrictions on where part 103 aircraft can be flown, mostly they are intended to be flown in uncontrolled airspace.
All part 103 aircraft are single place aircraft.
Aircraft may not be flown at night. (Maybe flown one half hour after sunset if equipped with an anti-collision light.)

 

Referred to the following sections on this page:
The regulations, Part 103
The preamble to the regulation
The FAA advisory circular (which spells out the particulars in implementing and policing ultralight aircraft.)